What Happens When Veteran Auto Journalists Race Their Camera Crew?

by Gabe Beita Kiser
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Turns out filming cars is a good way to get some track experience.
There’s a fine line between someone who’s good at translating experiences into words and actions and those who are just plain better at executing those actions. Unfortunately, in the niche trade of automotive journalism, those two areas of expertise don’t always coincide. It’s usually best to err on the side of being an entertainer than a race car driver, which seems to be something that Carfection’s skeleton crew does well. When a race amongst the camera crew and reviewers is proposed, that’s when things get interesting.
Without Alex Goy in the mix to learn these guys on the art of oversteer, these geeks with an addiction to tire smoke have to fend for themselves from the driver’s seat of a Land Rover Defender. As a blunt instrument rather than a precise scalpel, the Defender actually ends up being the perfect learner’s car.

What Happens When Veteran Auto Journalists Race Their Camera Crew?
And we learned when we discovered that veteran racing coach Rob Wilson uses a Vauxhall Astra to coach professional Formula 1 drivers on how to get around the track, simplicity is key. Once they learn how to go around the track, the camera crew gets to challenge the veteran journalists in cars like the Renault Clio hot hatch or even the BMW M4. With leaderboard positions on the line, Henry gets behind the wheel of the Ariel Atom to show his camera crew up but soon learns he may need lessons of his own when a few humiliating spinouts put him in his place.

What Happens When Veteran Auto Journalists Race Their Camera Crew?
What Happens When Veteran Auto Journalists Race Their Camera Crew?



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by Gabe Beita Kiser
What Happens When Veteran Auto Journalists Race Their Camera Crew?
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